Wei-Lih Lee

Professor

Professor of Biological Sciences
Professor in the Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program

I am interested in understanding how eukaryotic cells organize, position, and segregate their organelles during asymmetric cell divisions. We combine classical genetics and live-cell microscopy with biochemical and biophysical techniques to elucidate the molecular pathways that regulate the microtubule cytoskeleton and the motor proteins responsible for organellar interaction and positioning in our model system budding yeast.

Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center, room 224
HB 6044
Department:
Biological Sciences
Education:
B.S. University of Iowa
Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University

Selected Publications

Zhu Y., An X., Tomaszewski A., Hepler P.K., W.-L. Lee (2017). Microtubule-crosslinking activity of She1 ensures metaphase spindle stability for spindle positioning. Journal of Cell Biology, 216(9):2759-2775.

Bezanilla M., Gladfelter A.S., Kovar D.R., W.-L. Lee (2015). Cytoskeletal dynamics: a view from the membrane. Journal of Cell Biology, 209(3):329-37.

Markus S.M., Omer S., Baranowski K., W.-L. Lee (2015). Improved plasmids for fluorescent protein tagging of microtubules in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Traffic, 16(7):773-86.

Markus S.M., Kalutkiewicz K.A., W.-L. Lee (2012). She1-mediated inhibition of dynein motility along astral microtubules promotes polarized spindle movements. Current Biology, 22(23):2221-30.

Collins E.S., Balchand S.K., Faraci J.L., Wadsworth P., W.-L. Lee (2012). Cell cycle-regulated cortical dynein/dynactin promotes symmetric cell division by differential pole motion in anaphase. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 23(17):3380-90.

Tang X.Y., Germain B.J., W.-L. Lee (2012). A novel patch assembly domain in Num1 mediates dynein anchoring at the cortex during spindle positioning. Journal of Cell Biology, 196(6):743-56.

Markus S.M., W.-L. Lee (2011). Regulated offloading of cytoplasmic dynein from microtubule plus ends to the cortex. Developmental Cell, 20:639-651.

Tang X.Y., J.J. Punch, W.-L. Lee (2009). A CAAX motif can compensate for the PH domain of Num1 for cortical dynein attachment. Cell Cycle, 8(19):3182-3190.