Undergraduate Studies Overview

We offer undergraduate courses that enable majors and non-majors to understand and evaluate a broad spectrum of biological information. 

2021 Honors Thesis Presentation Schedule

May 20th

9:00 AM: Reyn Hutten – Phosphorus distribution and depletion along a natural age gradient in arid soils of Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland.

Research Advisor: Ross Virginia

May 21st

3:00 PM: Sophia Koval – Characterization and origin of the YfiBNR diguanylate cyclase system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

Research Advisor: George O'Toole

May 25th

9:00 AM: Claudia Durbin – Smart sutures and bandages for non-enzymatic glucose monitoring.

Research Advisor: Katherine Mirica

May 26th

3:00 PM: Benjamin Zdasiuk - Sentinel Salmonids: Evaluating acid-aluminum stress at watershed, fish community, and physiological scales in the Northeastern U.S.

Research Advisor: Celia Chen

May 27th

2:00 PM: Erin Dickert - RNA-Binding Protein Pumilio is Required for Accurate Chromosome Segregation in the Drosophila Ovary.

Research Advisor: Sharon Bickel

May 28th

12:00 PM: James Gow - Inhibiting Acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase as a potential therapeutic for foam cell mediated neurodegeneration and persistent inflammation.

Research Advisor: T.Y. Chang

May 28th

3:00 PM: Julianne Strauch - Bioinformatics analysis of alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases identifies potential mechanisms of oxygen sensing and hypoxia adaptation in the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

Research Advisor: Robert Cramer

June 1st

10:00 AM: Quintin Tyree - Canopy Architecture and the Evolution of Gliding Vertebrates.

Research Advisor: Nate Dominy

June 1st

3:00 PM: Tyler Lee - Targets and interactors of the iron deficiency response transcription factor, URI, in Arabidopsis.

Research Advisor: Mary Lou Guerinot

June 2nd

3:00 PM: Melissa Wang - Optogenetics-mediated acute inhibition of small GTPase Rho1 reveals its stage-specific function during early Drosophila embryogenesis.

Research Advisor: Bing He

Undergraduate Studies

Students find diverse opportunities to pursue cutting-edge research in faculty laboratories and hands-on experimentation. Majors develop an in-depth understanding within an area of concentration, while non-majors explore research methods and approaches in the life sciences. 

Our faculty are committed to providing students with a broad exposure to biological processes and systems and a deep understanding of biology at environmental, organismal, cellular, and molecular levels.

With their faculty advisors, students extract DNA from plant and animal cells, study genetics of diverse life forms and species, translate their findings to higher organisms, and potentially impact human diseases and find solutions to environmental problems.

Our learning objectives for undergraduates

Majors

  • Acquire a foundation in biology in order to understand and evaluate a broad spectrum of biological information; for example, information presented in the media and relevant to public policy decisions.
  • Develop an in-depth understanding within a biological area of concentration, designed in consultation with faculty to meet the student’s educational and career goals. Such depth will allow students to understand and critically evaluate current scientific literature in one or more areas of biology.
  • Understand research methods and approaches currently used in the life sciences through coursework and through an independent research project under the supervision of a Dartmouth faculty member.
  • Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  • Develop written and oral communication skills, allowing for accurate communication of biology information to scientists and non-scientists.

Our learning objectives for undergraduates

Minors

  • Acquire a foundation in biology in order to understand and evaluate a broad spectrum of biological information; for example, information presented in the media and relevant to public policy decisions.
  • Understand research methods and approaches currently used in the life sciences through coursework and by having the opportunity to perform an independent research project under the supervision of a Dartmouth faculty member.
  • Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  • Develop written and oral communication skills, allowing for accurate  communication of biology information to scientists and non-scientists.

General Information

This site provides information useful to current and prospective undergraduate students, including descriptions of our course majors and minors, and advising program; an overview of research opportunities in biology; and helpful links about careers in biology. To learn more about a particular topic, use the links listed in this section on Undergraduate Studies.

If you have any questions not covered here or in the Organization-Regulations-Courses (ORC), please contact any member of the Undergraduate Committee. Undergraduate Committee members are Prof. Natasha Grotz and Prof. Thomas Jack. If you are a prospective student and would like to set up an appointment with a faculty member, please contact the department office by email.

If you would like assistance with introductory or foundation courses in biology, the Teaching Science Fellows may be able to help.  For more information, please click on this link to visit their web page.

 

 

 

 

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